Learning New Dances from Barbara Herring

After three sessions with Barbara Herring with some but few repeats, my mind was full and my body wanted to keep going. So I was so glad I could get together with Mairy to practice a couple of them. We were pretty pleased with ourselves that we could figure out and “get” five of them. I would have been pleased with two or three.

And in view of the fact that they’re not the easiest dances, we’re looking for a chance to share them with other groups. And if you were at the sessions and want to get together informally to try them out, just let me know.

These are the ones we’ve “got”… But we’ll have to check the steps and practice again before sharing in a group. Probably some will be included in our April 29th event, either in the afternoon as we practice teaching them to others and/or in the evening when Mairy’s weaving the program of more challenging dances for experienced dancers.

  • Gentle Arms of Eden
  • River of Dreams
  • Wonderland
  • Musta Musta
  • Laughing by the Well

I think two other dancers have each taken on one of the other dances

  • Joy/Anandamayi
  • Relojes de Campagna (the opening dance with 8 steps)

So our repertoire is expanding thanks to Barbara and other visiting teachers.

Coming up Rosie Turnbull from Findhorn will be with us this coming Thursday the 19th 11am-1pm.

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Barbara Herring in Vancouver April 9th – Join us!

BarbaraHerringFlorida2016Barbara Herring will be here in BC from Ontario in April and will be at the Unitarian Centre on Monday, April 9th. There will also be a Tuesday April 10th event in Ladner. Check with circledanceladner@gmail.com for more information.

I, Mary, am coordinating the afternoon and potluck dinner. Corinne will be working with Barbara for the regular 2nd Monday evening.

Barbara is considered one of the “Grandmothers” of Circle Dance in Canada.  Two of her dances are on our favourites list.

  • Blessed Be
  • Go In Beauty

Other lovely choreographies of Barbara’s we have danced are

  • Crescent Moon
  • Holy Mother
  • Dancing Song
  • I Am the Land
  • Loved By a Star
  • Who By Fire

Barbara will likely share some of her favorite dances and other facilitators will share as well so she can have the pleasure (her request!) to just dance with us.

Come experience the calmness, joy and reverence that Barbara Herring brings to the dance. Barbara has been a facilitator of Sacred Circle Dance groups in Canada and the USA since 1996 and during that time has been midwife to the birth of many groups in her home province, Ontario.

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Hallelujah for the Whole World

We did this very joyful dance yesterday at our Imbolc ritual/circle dance. The only word I could catch was “Hallelujah” so I went down the google rabbit hole to learn more. The words are in Finnish. And one site calls it “The Finnish Mass”.

Choreographed by Nanni Kloke  https://www.findhorn.org/people/nanni-kloke/

Music origin: The Finnish Mass

A source for the music is “Kuule Minun Aaneni – Hiljaisuunden Iauluja (Finngospel FGCD 5090) {Han ei ole enaa taala}”

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OE7yL3dpD04

Hiljaisuuden Lauluja – Hän ei ole enää täällä

In case you know a little Finnish, or would like to learn, here are the lyrics.

Miksi hiivit hänen haudalleen? Hän ei ole enää täällä Etkö aamun huomaa valjenneen?

Hän ylösnoussut on! Halleluja, tulkaa katsomaan

Hän ei ole enää täällä Halleluja, soikoon maailmaan:

Hän ylösnoussut on! Miksi jäisit vielä pimeyteen?

Hän ei ole enää täällä Anna valon päästä sydämeen

Hän ylösnoussut on! Halleluja, tulkaa katsomaan

Hän ei ole enää täällä Halleluja, soikoon maailmaan:

Hän ylösnoussut on! Miksi yhä kuljet allapäin?

Hän ei ole enää täällä Nouse, veljillesi kerro näin:

Hän ylösnoussut on!

Music

“Han ei ole enaa taalla (arr. P. Nyman, P. Simojoki, J. Kivimaki and K. Mannila)” by Hiljaisuuden Lauluja & Field Musicians (iTunes)

It’s about Easter…

Through a rather clumsy translation tool, I’ve cobbled together these meanings. It’s about Easter, I’d say. If someone has an English translation more elegant than this, please do send to me.

Miksi hiivit hänen haudalleen?  Why visit his grave?

Hän ei ole enää täällä  He is no longer here

Etkö aamun huomaa valjenneen?  Did not you notice widened in the morning?

Hän ylösnoussut on  He is resurrected

tulkaa katsomaan come and see

soikoon maailmaan   soikoon world

Miksi jäisit Why stay in the

vielä pimeyteen  still in darkness

Anna valon päästä sydämeen  Give light to reach the heart

Nouse, veljillesi kerro näin: Arise, let your brothers saw

yhä kuljet allapäin  still traveling throughout the

Huron Carol

I found this circle dance for the Huron Carol.


Here’s some information from the youtube page.
This is one of my choreographed dances to the Huron Carol. This recording is by The Crash Test Dummies from ‘Jingle all the Way’. I play it 5% faster for the dance. Even so it demands a presence of attention.

And here’s an alternative version with words by the choreographer.

Dances Choreographed by Brian Steere – but his website livingcircle.net isn’t working.
Here’s his blog with a couple of pretty long posts about his experience with circle dance.
http://dancing-in-the-heart.blogspot.ca/search/label/about%20me

Dance Palette

palette_layoutYou know what a palette is to a visual artist, right? Well this is what a palette for a circle dance session can look like. All the possibilities are there on the palette (flip chart paper) and the dance facilitator (or “weaver”) picks the ones that work as the session goes on.

Some will be ones the facilitator might teach; some are ones participants have offered to teach and some are requests from participants that they’d like someone else to teach.

Dance Palette BEFORE

The Cobourg group uses a “dance palette” approach–all possible dances are put on a flip chart – way more than could possibly be danced!

Dance Palette AFTER

Then the ones that are danced are underlined and voted on. Someone stands near the flip chart at the break and end so that people less familiar with the dances can say, “I loved the one where we walked backwards” (or whatever) and they can learn what the name is. I’d love to try this at one of our circles. Maybe when Brigitte is here in Vancouver.

Recently I tried this when I was responsible for the first hour at one of our collaborative Tuesday night sessions. I had a playlist already to go, in the order I thought I’d do if we were mainly regulars. Then I had some extras at the bottom in case for whatever reason I felt some of those dances wouldn’t work. I lined up a helper to start the music so I could be free to pay attention to the group. As it happens we had three people brand new to circle dancing, and I changed things quite a lot to start with very simple dances so people could gain confidence as we went along and dropped some of the more difficult ones. I felt sure I’d like this approach, as it fits with my experience as a facilitator in other settings.

Some dances are “left on the palette” for another time. In other words they weren’t “used” this time around but might be in future.

In some circles at the break and end of the session, participants are invited to vote on which dances they’d like to do again and those “winners” are repeated in the following session.

Brigitte Evering

Brigitte Evering is coming to Vancouver in September.

Here’s the plan for Friday September 15 at the Unitarian Centre.

Afternoon for circle dance facilitators or experienced dancers considering facilitation.

Evening – open to all

I’m looking forward to learning from her experience and passion for dance. Stay tuned for more opportunities.

Here’s more about Brigitte:

Brigitte has been sharing her love of circle dance since 1996. She and her partner Geoffrey co-facilitate a circle in Cobourg, dance in Ontario and the US, as well as being familiar faces at Great Lakes Dance Camp. Brigitte’s clear and skillful teaching allows dancers to access a wide range of traditional and choreographed dances. She has danced across North America as well as in the UK and Australia gathering dances like friends, to share with her communities. Her joyful fire invites dancers to warm themselves with dances from the simple and sweet, to faster and fancy. Come…join in the dance… let’s affirm life together!

Dance Palette BEFORE

The Cobourg group uses a “dance palette” approach–all possible dances are put on a flip chart – way more than could possibly be danced!

Dance Palette AFTER

Then the ones that are danced are underlined and voted on. Someone stands near the flip chart at the break and end so that people less familiar with the dances can say, “I loved the one where we walked backwards” (or whatever) and they can learn what the name is. I’d love to try this at one of our circles. Maybe when Brigitte is here in Vancouver.


Here’s Brigitte’s blog about her Ph.D. work at Trent University.

https://brigitteevering.wordpress.com/

Friedel Kloke-Eibl

Sacred Dance – Friedel Kloke-Eibl (see below for information from her website)
We did the Serenade for Spring dance choreographed by Friedel in Ladner in April.

There are beautiful videos of Friedel dancing with a group on her youtube channel. Mesmerizing! https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCn98l37u_Kfs8Q7qsogOm_w

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Crescent Moon (Coyita, Ronroco)

I’m looking forward to dancing this circle dance Crescent Moon choreographed by Barbara Herring from Ontario. Actually perhaps I’ve danced it before as Barbara’s been out here in Vancouver multiple times. I love the music, which is a track called Coyita on the CD Ronroco by Gustavo Santaolalla.

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